Link

We’re excited to finally let this secret out! See, we’ve been working on a website for a little while now and it feels great to reveal the finished result.

Ladies and gents, we give you the all-new Club Punta Fuego official website — web copywriting by us, of course.

Burning The Midnight Oil

night lamp

We’ve been too busy writing for clients, we’ve neglected our own space. We’ll be posting updates, writing tips and tricks, and maybe even some anecdotes on our writing escapades soon.

Stay tuned.

US vs UK English: How not to cock up

US vs UK EnglishA Brit asks an American for a fag at a club and gets a rather raunchy response . It may be all those residual tension from the American Revolutionary War or simply a US vs UK English confusion gone wild.

So how does one avoid this mortifying scenario? Make note of some commonly confused terms below to help you slither through sticky situations.

ALL RIGHT?  (UK) vs.  HOW ARE YOU? (US)

When a Brit asks you “All right?” it’s not because you look like you just came out of a crashed car, it’s their way of asking “How are you?”

ANTI-CLOCKWISE (UK) vs. COUNTER-CLOCKWISE (US)

It’s not a leftist campaign against clocks or even the clockwise direction, it’s simply the way they say counter-clockwise in Blighty.

BESPOKE (UK) vs. CUSTOMIZED (US)

The Brits have it this time. ‘Bespoke’ just rolls so nicely off the tongue. So classy.

BIGGIE (UK) vs. BIGGIE (US)

Biggie isn’t the word you’d want to be using in England when naming your products (*cough* Wendy’s *cough*), it’s baby talk for poop. Biggie, in American English, means large and has nothing to do with poop.

BOOB TUBE (UK) vs. BOOB TUBE (US)

Americans have it this time, boob tube in US English is far nicer than the UK counterpart where it means what it suggests. In US English, it means television, or as Brits call it, the telly.

CASHPOINT MACHINE (UK) vs. ATM (US)

Americans have it again, ‘cashpoint machine’ is just too wordy.

CHEMIST (UK) vs. DRUGSTORE (US)

If you find yourself with a massive headache in the UK and in desperate need of a paracetamol, don’t go asking around for a drugstore as you will never find relief, our British friends call the drugstore “chemist”.

COZZY (UK) vs. COZY (US)

Don’t mix these two up when making plans with a friend. In UK English, it means swimsuit while the US version connotes staying warm and snug.

DRESSER (UK) vs. DRESSER (US)

If an American is crashing on an English friend’s couch, he shouldn’t look for a shirt in the dresser, what he’ll find there are plates and cutlery.

POWER POINT (UK) vs. POWERPOINT (US)

A British power point won’t help you finish your report, except maybe provide electricity to your computer, it’s what the Brits call power sockets.

Freelance writers the world over are often asked if they are adept at US or UK English. For most Asian writers, the latter is quite confuddling.  (No, Asian neighbor, calling a flashlight “torch” doesn’t make you a UK English expert.) So,we at WhiteHat Copy, will give away US and UK writing tips that go beyond Hollywood and Harry Potter on our next post.

Until then, cheerio!

Hello there, 2013!

Hey y’all! We hope you’ve had a wonderful Christmas break and New Year’s celebrations. We’re excited for new things in the pipeline for WhiteHat Copy and will be blogging again with new material soon. ‘Til then, stay focused and keep writing!

 

Writing Tip Wednesday: Make a stand with your brand

With everyone content-managing their sites and SEO-ing their work, how can you make your brand stand out? Make a stand with your brand.

whitehat copy writing tip branding

Branding is not just about what your logo, typeface, colors, or ringback tones say about who you are and what you do. It is more about what you stand for, what you believe in, what is at your core.
Let’s revisit the example we used in Branding your Copy. The ritzy Italian restaurant stands for elegance, fine taste and opulence. And that is exactly what is expected of everything their brand is attached to: from the restroom fixtures, to the drop lights, to the scents that permeate the air, even down to the staff’s nails. Any obvious deviation from that will threaten how their brand is perceived. So, it’s important to ensure everyone’s adherence to the restaurant’s brand image.
But what will make this ritzy Italian restaurant distinct from dozens of other similar places that serve the same cuisine, play the same quaint music, and employ the same decor?
That’s where brands need to dig into their core to see what makes them tick. If the world draws a line to separate the good from the better, the mediocre from the great, the mere mortals from the sublime, what would give this particular one instant recall?
Making sure the pantry is filled with only the freshest ingredients and the cellar with the finest wines are all astute restaurant management practices that will no doubt earn a thumbs up. But what exactly builds brand loyalty in the digital age? Relatability. And a brand can only be relatable if it bares its soul.
Where does your brand stand on the issue of fair wage? Equal opportunity employment? Ecological health? These are all issues consumers care about. And brands that care about the same causes are endearing to consumers.
Needless to say, the cause has to be real and the stand has to be genuine. In this digital age where information travels at the speed of light, phoniness can be a brand’s undoing.
A brand that stands for ecological health will not stop at segregated garbage and paperless transactions but will actually go out and support environmental organizations and activities. Outfitting the offices with natural power sources and reclaimed water will be a natural part of their infrastructure development plans.
A brand’s stand is what makes the difference when all experiences, prices, promos, customer service or algorithms are about the same. It is what seals the deal.
Make your brand stand out. Make a stand with your brand.